Subscribe to Our RSS Feed
  • Home|
  • Blog|
  • Wensleydale: A British Classic for Summer’s End
Madame Fromage

Wed|Sep

15

By

Wensleydale: A British Classic for Summer’s End

Wensleydale

! EN-2010

Besides being a star in Wallace & Gromit cartoons, Wensleydale has a great story. It’s made by a single creamery in Yorkshire, England that relies on a recipe from twelfth-century Cistercian monks. Production has been up and down over the years, but right now there are gorgeous wheels to be had, making this mild, toothsome cheese the Clothbound Must-Have of the moment.

Wensleydale is yogurty with a tender crumb. It is the baby’s breath of cheeses, so light and dainty you could serve it to newborns. It smells like cheesecake – lemony and lactic – and pairs beautifully with fruit. If you need a farewell-to-summer cheese, this is it. It’s bright as a blossom.

The British writer Patricia Michelson recommends splitting figs or plums and crumbling “the freshest possible” Wensleydale over top. I got carried away and added a drizzle of honey. Apples would be a lovely accompaniment, too, or you could plan a proper tea and serve Wensleydale with fig bread or oat scones.

I tend toward strong cheeses when given the choice, but Wensleydale has won me over with its cozy, mellow vibe. Wensleydale Creamery makes a variety of mass market cheeses, so just be sure to look for a wedge off the cloth-bound drum. A light red wine or medium-dry Madeira pairs well in the glass.

1 Comment

  • sell this domain at sedo says:
    October 11, 2010 at 12:54 pm

    What a wonderful blog. I invest hours on the internet reading blogs, about tons of different subjects. I have to to begin with give kudos to whoever created your web site and second of all to you for writing what i can only describe as an post. I honestly believe there is a skill to writing articles that only several posses and to be truthful you have it. The combination of informative and quality content is definitely very rare with the big quantity of blogs on the internet.

Add a Comment* Required Field